Saturday, June 15

This Master Photographer Deliberately Records the Motion Blur to Create Masterpieces

Motion Blur is a nightmare for all photographers almost all the time. There are some limited occasions where photographers capture the motion blur intentionally. But, we bet you haven’t seen a photographer is trying to capture motion blur while shooting a ‘performing art’ event. Typically, one tries to capture a performing art clean and sharp as much as possible. We at Fotomated are going to show you the total opposite of that today.

Henry Rajakaruna is a pioneer in the photography field in Sri Lanka. He is the one and only photographer who holds MFIAP (Master Photographer of FIAP) in Sri Lanka as of today. While capturing theatrical performances in the early ’80s, it occurred to him that recording the movement of the performers can create a unique form of art, instead of freezing the moment. Hence, he started experimenting with using extremely slow shutter speeds so that the motion blur is created when the performers move. The project is named ‘Dance in a Trance’.

Image credit & More info: henryrajakaruna.com | Facebook

Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna

The results of his experiment came out with ultimate success. Over the years he mastered the craft and it is developed as a whole new photography technique, ‘Rajakaurana style’. His images are so surreal and captivating. And it is the very project that the photographer submitted to FIAP for the distinction ‘MFIAP’. It was well received by the FIAP making him the first photographer from Sri Lanka to get ‘Master Photographer of FIAP’.

(c) Henry Rajakaruna
Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna

These are not mere slow shutter photographs. Each image contains sharp elements as well as blurry elements, which are composed carefully. According to the photographer, there are three methods to capture a photograph like this. One of them requires post-processing while the other two are solely based on how the image is captured.

What do you think about this art? Do share your thoughts in the comments section.

Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
Dance in a Trance
(c) Henry Rajakaruna
(c) Henry Rajakaruna

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